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December 2014 Archives

Don't toss that tree! (or the lights)

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Christmas is behind us and many festive trees will soon be stripped of their finery.

If your tree is artificial, then back into storage (we hope!) it goes. But for those who chose a live tree, Knoxville and Knox County have disposal options to keep them out of our landfills and some organizations will also recycle trees and other items. Above, News Sentinel photographer Adam Lau photographed trees dropped off for recycling at Ijams Nature Center.

Knox County residents can drop off their tree anytime in January for free at one of five Knox County recycling centers. Just remove all ornaments, lights, wire, string and other decorations before bringing them to be tree-cycled and reused as mulch and other soil amendments. This option is also open to city of Knoxville residents.

Locations of Christmas Treecycling

  • Dutchtown Convenience Center - 10618 Dutchtown Road
  • Halls Convenience Center - 3608 Neal Drive
  • John Sevier Convenience Center - 1950 West John Sevier Highway
  • Powell Convenience Center - 7311 Morton View Lane
  • Tazewell Pike Convenience Center - 7201 Tazewell Pike

Christmas tree collection for city of Knoxville residents is the same process as for brush collection. Remove decorations and put your tree on the curb. Keep in mind it may stay there for a while -- the regular two-week brush pickup schedule won't resume until Feb. 1, according to the city website.  For faster removal, city residents can also take advantage of the Knox County recycling options above.

Other recycling options can help you give back to community organizations, or earn you a discount on next year's decorations.

Westminster Presbyterian Church in Knoxville is one of the first 20 congregations to be designated a Certified Cool Congregation by Interfaith Power and Light for its energy efficiency efforts.

The certification is a culmination of 20 years of effort in the church's "Creation Care" initiative to reduce its environmental impact, writes Larisa Brass in the Knoxville News Sentinel.

The congregation has upgraded the church's windows, lights and installed an energy management system that reduced its carbon emissions by 4.5 tons.

The church is also looking for ways to save energy that help it financially as well. A recent installation of a 5kw solar array added to the other upgrades mean the church saves about 30 percent on energy costs.

The solar installation was installed with a $16,000 grant through Knoxville's Solar America Cities program and offsets 5 percent of the church's electricity needs.

Environmental groups including the Tennessee Clean Water Network, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and others say an expansion of TVA's Kingston landfill could lead to coal waste leaking into the Clinch River.

TVA has filed for a major permit modification  with the Tennessee Department of Environment and conservation for the Kingston site and plans an expansion to store waste generated by the Kingston Fossil Plant.

Opponents say the site is unstable and not suited for a landfill due to sink holes and other karst geologic features.

As part of the permitting process, TVA submitted an updated operations manual for the site, which details preliminary expansion efforts begun in September 2013 and estimates Phase II of construction from 2016 to 2020 depending on TDEC approval.

TDEC will review public comment on the proposal through Tuesday.

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This page is an archive of entries from November 2016 listed from newest to oldest.

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