An environmental resource for East Tennessee Businesses

February 2014 Archives

Ed McMahon, a national consultant on sustainable development, will be the next speaker for the ETcompetes series presented by the Plan East Tennessee Consortium.

He is the author or coauthor of 15 books including Conservation Communities: Creating Value with Nature, Open Space, and Agriculture, a guide for urban planning professionals.

McMahon, senior resident fellow at the Urban Land Institute in Washington, D.C., presents "Secrets of Successful Communities" 10:30-11:30 a.m. March 27 at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay St. He will discuss building a prosperous community and how to take inventory of community assets as part of a development vision.

Other topics include:

  • What's next in real estate?
  • Calculating the economic benefits of preserving and enhancing community character
  • Changes in the retail paradigm
  • Economic changes and effective solutions

AIA and GBCI continuing education credits available.

RSVP required to Julie.ETQG@gmail.com or dori.caron@knoxmpc.org.

PlanET is a regional planning collaboration among East Tennessee local governments and organizations that seeks to establish a framework for potential growth in the region that addresses challenges regarding jobs, housing, transportation, a clean environment, and community health.

The latest updates from the city of Knoxville's Office of Sustainability show reductions in emissions and energy use both for city operations and the community as a whole.

The city's Energy and Sustainability Initiative, now in its seventh year, measures energy savings and greenhouse gas emission reductions through sustainability improvements for Knoxville. The eventual goal is a 20 percent reduction by 2020.

As a municipality, the city reduced its energy consumption by 6.5 percent. Greenhouse gas emissions associated with city operations fell 13 percent.

At the community level, the emissions associated with energy use, transportation and waste management fell 7.8 percent from 2005 levels.

"These savings reflect the success of projects like the city's conversion of traffic signals to LED technology and energy efficiency upgrades at city buildings," said Jake Tisinger, Project Manager for the Office of Sustainability, in a press release. "Residents and businesses are using less energy than in 2005, and improved fuel economy and cleaner electricity generation have helped reduce greenhouse gas emissions."

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This page is an archive of entries from November 2016 listed from newest to oldest.

October 2016 is the previous archive.

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